Tagged: Bryce Harper

Here, Not There: A Summer in Cincinnati

As freshman year at Xavier University has come to a close, people are asking me when I’m going to be able to make it back to the great land of Northern Virginia. While I might make it back for a quick weekend sometime soon, I’ll be here in the Queen City for the summer. So, I just wanted to throw out a quick post wrapping up the year at Xavier and setting the scene for what should be an exciting summer, both personally and for the Nationals.

Before I get into some Nats news, here’s what I’ve been up to over the last year. I did the sports report for Xavier News periodically…

Additionally, I did play-by-play for several home baseball games for Xavier, who by the way won the Big East regular season championship and begin play in the Big East tournament tomorrow.

This summer, I landed a spot doing play-by-play via internet stream for the Hamilton Joes, a collegiate summer baseball team in a league similar to the well-known Cape Cod league. I will be doing the home games, as well as frequently doing road games.

Now on to the Nats, where the powers that be at ESPN have them at third behind the North Siders and the Fenway-dwellers. Do these rankings really mean anything? Nope. But, one thing noted under the Nats’ wrap-up stands out; Scherzer, he of the 20K game, has the highest ERA on the team at 3.80. Bryce seems to have come back down to Earth after his torrid stretch to start the season, but is still producing at a high level. Daniel Murphy and Wilson Ramos are carrying a mighty stick, and the rest of the lineup is starting to fall into place.

The Nats’ starting pitchers have the 2nd lowest ERA, 4th lowest WHIP, and highest strikeout percentage throughout all of the major leagues, according to ESPN Stats and Info. Yeah, all of this is pretty basic information, but it’s promising to see them do so well, especially against a team like the Mets.

Washington comes to Cincinnati the weekend of June 3rd, and I’m hoping to go Friday and Sunday if possible. In addition to attending Jake Arrieta’s no-hitter in April, I saw the Reds play the Cubs two more times that weekend, including once with Steve.

Paul and me at Great American

I would be remiss if I did not throw this in here. The day after Arrieta’s no-hitter, I was at the game with my hall as a result of free tickets from our RA, and after the game there were fireworks of all sorts. I am enamored with home run derbies, as you can tell, and in between the end of the game and the fireworks show, the Long Haul Bombers (video from 2010) lit up the night sky, propelling neon-colored softballs well into the second deck at Great American Ball Park. What a weekend at GABP that was.

So, here’s to what’s ahead. And oh by the way, you’re always welcome to take a listen.

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Welcome Back, Baseball

It has been quite some time since this page has been active, and I got to figurin’ that that ought to change. College basketball has consumed the vast majority of my sporting interests since early November, but as Bronson Koenig ended the dreams of my beloved Xavier Musketeers all-too-early in March, I have turned back to the national pastime. A great couple college basketball and the MLB make; when one ends the other begins.

Ryan Zimmerman

I have been thinking about various ideas for this site in particular, and I will try and take advantage of whatever opportunities are available to cover the team from my perspective over the course of the season. I’m sure my good friend Steve Miller and I will have some more stories to share from Nationals Park.

Harper

It has been exactly six months (or about 183 days and 26 minutes) since the Washington Nationals last played a game that counted in the standings. Granted, it was a loss to the New York Mets, but it was a real game nonetheless. Now, it’s go time. In about ten minutes, reigning NL MVP Bryce Harper, ace Max Scherzer, and the rest of the Nationals will get their season underway against the Atlanta Braves. As the Nationals Twitter account has been promoting throughout spring training, the Nats have #OnePursuit. Many speculate that with injuries, age, and impending free agencies, the window for the Nats to win is slowly closing. Today marks the first step on this particular journey.

Harper and the Squad

So, without further ado…let’s do this thing.

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Saying Goodbye to a Win and a Park

It was a solemn day, Friday, as it marked the final time I would be making the trek to Nationals Park in the 2015 season. As distance abounds between the park and my place of learning, I will have to settle for cheering on the team from the constraints of my dorm room.

Last week produced a whirlwind of events, not all of which were positive in nature. In fact, Steve and I only saw the Nationals win once in our four games, and Friday’s finale proved to be the most gut-wrenching of all as I will relay to you below. For a full background on the tales of the week that did not all pertain to the national pastime, be sure to check out Steve’s recap here.

Steve and I arrived to the park right as the gates opened, allowing ample opportunity for batting practice leading up to the game. I tracked a Jayson Werth bomb that was my best chance as of yet, but I made it across the aisle just too late and the ball skimmed off the edge of my glove. Luckily, I had a chance at redemption only a few moments later when Werth hit another one; this time the ball found itself securely in the back of my glove. As for Steve, he made an acrobatic catch on a home run by none other than Dan Uggla, one of his favorite MLB players. imageThe Colorado Rockies took their turn but did not produce many home runs to where we were standing in the Red Porch, save for one caught by Steve.

We meandered around the stadium as we killed time before first pitch attempting to find some consumables along the way. Upon filling our stomachs with some delightful American food, it was time to go watch some baseball.

The Nats got off to yet another good start, taking an early 1-0 lead in the first inning. Pitcher Jordan Zimmermann did his part in shutting the door and held the Rockies off the board until the seventh inning. He got an extra run of support in the fourth along with two more insurance runs in the sixth to make it 4-0 entering the final third of the game.image

Colorado trailed 4-1 in the eighth as recently-dominant relief man Drew Storen strode to the mound from the bullpen. For the first time since the Papelbon trade, he allowed a runner to reach scoring position. All of a sudden the bases were juiced. And then…Carlos Gonzalez put the Rockies ahead with one swing of the bat, a laser over the right field fence.

Nationals Park was deflated. What looked to be a certain 4-1 victory had see-sawed into a 5-4 deficit seemingly in the blink of an eye. It was not over yet, and the Nats had two more chances to muster just the one run they needed to tie it back up.

The Nats left a runner stranded at third in the bottom of the eighth, so still behind by one in the ninth, they were looking at 9-1-2 coming to the plate.

One runner reached, and the Nationals had none other than Bryce Harper coming to the dish with two outs, down by a single run. One swing of the bat and the home crowd would be going home exuberant, but it was not to be. Tommy Kahnle earned his first career save and the game was over. With yet another Mets win, the Nats were now 2.5 games behind in the division.Steve and II watched the post-game Freedom Fireworks with a strong sense of nostalgia. The summer was quickly coming to a conclusion and I will soon be heading off to begin another chapter in my life. Hopefully, my beloved Nationals can write themselves a storybook ending to their season.Steve and I departing Nationals ParkSee you next year, Nationals Park.

Ramos Rights Ship: Nationals Win on Day Two

imageDay Two of Steve and my’s baseballing escapades commenced Tuesday, this time with the same crew that took on the park nearly two years ago.

We got there a few minutes before the gates opened, prime time for catching home runs in batting practice for both teams. We quickly made our way down to the Red Porch as the Nationals took their hacks.

Not many home runs came out our way, but Wilson Ramos managed to clobber one into the restaurant section of the Red Porch. I was standing by the first row of the seating section as I watched it sail way over my head. It hit the ground uncaught and promptly bounced all the way back to where I was standing. The ball found itself in my glove, and I was ensured I was not leaving for home empty handed.image

Another takeaway from batting practice was Bryce Harper. He usually does not take BP on the field, but chose to on this day and put on a display. He hit upper-decker after upper-decker, including one into the third deck which was probably the longest home run I had ever witnessed in person.

Also of note was Denard Span, who was taking ground balls in centerfield. Span, working his way back from back problems, hopes to return to the lineup soon to provide that leadoff spark the Nationals so desperately need.

After batting practice had concluded and we had made our way to our seats, we were informed by the PA announcer that, despite the sun shining, a delay was in effect for an impending storm. The storm never came to fruition and the game started around 7:35.

image

From left: Ben, Jack, Steve, and I

Max Scherzer squared off against Diamondbacks southpaw Patrick Corbin, who was making his sixth start of the year after coming off Tommy John Surgery.While the first inning did not go very well for Mr. Corbin, it went abundantly well for the home team. Yunel Escobar lead off with a home run to center, and two more runs crossed the plate before the third out was recorded. An early three run lead hoped to be a boost to Scherzer who has proved he does not need much run support to produce a win.image

However, three runs would not be enough. Scherzer labored through a 40 pitch 4th inning in which the D-backs scored the needed amount to tie the game. Things would remain knotted for several more innings until there came some drama in the later stages.image

Drew Storen entered in the top of the eighth for what would become yet another shutdown inning. To put in perspective how he has pitched since the Papelbon trade last week, let’s take a look:

It was the meat of the Nationals order for the bottom half of the eighth, and the game would not be tied in the 9th if they had anything to say about it. Ryan Zimmerman walked, Jayson Werth smacked a double into the left field corner, and Wilson Ramos strode to the plate with two runners in scoring position. He dropped a blooper into shallow right field allowing Zimmerman to score easily and Werth to come home and score from second. The crowd roared as Ramos gave his customary Buffalo horns on second, and the hit seemed to be a product of the day’s work for Wilson.

Jonathan Papelbon allowed one run in the 9th on a throwing error by third baseman Yunel Escobar, but shut the door quickly afterwards and earned his first save at home for his new team.

Papelbon ends the game himself as he tags out Chad Pennington running to first

Papelbon ends the game himself as he tags out Chad Pennington running to first

The Mets defeated the Marlins, so the Nats remain one game back of the Metropolitans.

Today is August 5th, or in the minds of Nationals fans, Jayson Werth Chia Pet day. It is also the one year anniversary of the Gnome day, as many of you may remember from last year. I’ll be there for the Chia Pet with a review of the event tomorrow.

Back, Back, Back: The 2015 Home Run Derby

“Back, back, back, back, back” “That’s a five-backer!”

Chris Berman’s booming voice marks what has become a staple of the Midsummer Classic – The Home Run Derby. Some of the most powerful sluggers on the planet convene in one ballpark one evening every summer for a night that consists of mammoth blasts and tape-measure bombs. The Derby has evolved into a fan-favorite, with ticket prices soaring into the hundreds as eager spectators try to nab a home run from the stands. In an attempt to make the Derby more watchable this year, the format has been significantly changed.

Instead of the classic “10 outs” format, this year it will be timed. Hitters will have 5:00 to go yard as many times as they can. Additionally, hitters can earn extra time for the distance of their hits. If a batter hits two balls 420’+ during one turn, they earn an extra minute. If a batter hits a ball 475’+, they earn an extra 30 seconds. Personally, I think this is a welcome change, as hitters will be less inclined to take pitch after pitch, waiting for that perfect strike to connect. Also, it is following a bracketed format where the participant with the most home runs this season is matched up against the player with the least. They square-off, the winner advances, and so on.

While it is disappointing that sluggers Giancarlo Stanton and Bryce Harper will not be participating in Cincinnati this year (broken hamate bone and personal decision, respectively), along with the two-time defending champion Yoenis Cespedes, the event still promises to be chock-full of entertainment with the A-list that is set to take part. Because of the popularity of the event, I thought it would be beneficial to provide those watching with just about all the information they could need in regards to being prepared for what they see.

First, we will take a look at the stadium.

Great American Ball Park

Located along the Ohio River just a short walking distance from Paul Brown Stadium (home of the NFL’s Bengals), the Reds played their first game at Great American in 2003. Affectionately known as the Great American Small Park due to the prolific amount of home runs hit there, Great American has seen quite a number of baseballs fly over its walls over the past 12 and a half seasons. At one point there was even a streak of 70+ games with a home run hit.

Great American Ball Park

The dimensions of the stadium are relatively generous, especially to the gaps. It’s only 328′ to left, 325′ to right, and 404′ to center. However, while in most stadiums the gaps are where it’s hard to muscle out a home run, it’s only 379′ to left-center and 370′ to right center. Along with what many believe to be a breeze that blows out towards the river from downtown, we can take a look at the park factor to see just how hitter friendly Great American is. In the 2014 season, GABP (Great American Ball Park) had a park factor for home runs of 113 according to FanGraphs. This was second only to the Rockies’ Coors Field of 116. Essentially what this means is that there are 13 more homers hit at GABP than the average Major League field. For righties, GABP had a home run park factor of 114, once again second to the Rockies at 115. Lefties on the other hand were just slightly less successful, something that will be interesting to note on Monday night as the three lefties attempt to hit a ball out of the stadium and into the Ohio River. GABP ranked fourth at 112 for lefties.

As you can see, the Ohio River is just across the street in right field; accessible by a power shot of a home run.

As you can see, the Ohio River is just across the street in right field; accessible by a power shot of a home run.

Many watching will be waiting to see if any balls leave the stadium. I have included video from two times that it has been done during a game. Adam Dunn holds the record for farthest home run hit at GABP: a 535 foot behometh in 2004 that promptly exited the stadium in Center field. A second 500’+ shot was recorded by Juan Francisco in 2011 and left the stadium over the right field stands (watch it here).

According to the distance calculator provided by the Reds, it looks to require about 500′ of power to blast one into the river. Hitting one into the river also means another significant accomplishment: hitting the ball into another state, as the Ohio there is actually owned by the commonwealth of Kentucky. Next, we take a look at the competitors.

Home Run Derby

#1 Albert Pujols vs. #8 Kris Bryant

It’s a match-up of experience vs. youth. Master vs. apprentice.

To be fair, Bryant hasn’t been in the majors all season to compile a larger home run total, as he made his debut on April 17th for the Chicago Cubs. His 12 home runs pale in comparison to Pujols’ 26, but Bryant definitely does not lack power. He has mashed some of the season’s longest, including this 477 footer off the Wrigley Field jumbotron. That dinger happens to be the second-longest of derby contestants; second only to Josh Donaldson’s 481′.  A third of his home runs have come in the first two pitches of his at-bats. Nine of the twelve have been to either left or left center, a good indication for what is to come on Monday. He is considered a part of the new generation of power-hitters, along with the likes of Trout, Harper, Puig, and now Joc Pederson and Joey Gallo.

Kris Bryant

Kris Bryant

Albert Pujols is entering his fourth Home Run Derby and enters as the #1 seed, but he has never won the event. He performed admirably but lost in the final round in 2003 to Garrett Anderson. He made an early exit in his two other appearances, 2007 and 2009. There’s more info on Pujols because of the much larger sample size, and especially at GABP. From his days on the Cardinals in the NL Central, Albert has visited Cincy and has played many a game in the Small Park, and has knocked 20 homers over his time there. Pujols has been on an absolute tear lately, hitting homer after homer; 18 of his 26 have come since May 27th. Pujols hit the 11th longest four-bagger at Great American with a distance of 477′ in 2003.

Albert Pujols

Albert Pujols

#2 Todd Frazier vs #7 Prince Fielder

Todd Frazier comes into the Derby as by far and away the crowd favorite since he is the hometown hero in Cincinnati.

As Brandon Phillips slowly phases out of the game, and Joey Votto sees patches of struggle, Frazier has evolved into a face of the franchise for the Reds. Frazier knows Great American better than any of the other contestants. He knows its nooks and crannies, he knows the power alleys, and, on top of that, he was the runner-up in the Home Run Derby last year in Minneapolis. In that Derby, it seemed Todd just seemed to do what was needed in order to advance. He only hit 10 total home runs, compared to the winner Cespedes’ 28. In round 3 and the final round, he only hit 1 homer in each round.

Frazier enters with 25 home runs and with an average true distance of 398.4′, according to the ESPN Home Run Tracker. Frazier will feed off the energy of the crowd, and it will be interesting to see how he uses his home park to his advantage as he tries to accomplish what he failed to last year. Frazier holds 4 of the 20 longest recorded home runs at GABP.

Todd Frazier from last year's Home Run Derby

Todd Frazier from last year’s Home Run Derby

Prince Fielder has been there and done that. The #7 seed has won the event twice, in 2009 and 2012. He also has the fourth-most total Derby homers of all-time with 68, and he has a chance to take over first place this year if he hits a total of 10. Fielder’s 13 bombs this year have an average true distance of 411.1′. He also has 12 career home runs at GABP. *Lefty alert* Be on river watch

Prince Fielder from the 2013 Home Run Derby

Prince Fielder from the 2013 Home Run Derby

#3 Josh Donaldson vs. #6 Anthony Rizzo

Former Oakland A’s standout Josh Donaldson has been a catalyst of the Blue Jays explosion of an offense this season. ESPN’s Home Run Tracker puts his average speed off the bat at 105.2 MPH, with an average true distance of 408.1′. Donaldson holds the longest home run of derby competitors after launching one 481.2′. His powerful swing will look to do damage as he seeks his first Home Run Derby title.

Josh Donaldson, pictured here with the Oakland Athletics

Josh Donaldson, pictured here with the Oakland Athletics

The second Cub and the second lefty we take a look at is Anthony Rizzo. His average true distance is just over 400′ at 402.1′. Six of his 87 career homers have come at GABP. With a top exit velocity of 112 MPH (third to last among participants), Rizzo is also seeking his first HRD crown. *Lefty alert* Be on river watch

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 06: Anthony Rizzo #44 of the Chicago Cubs hits a walk-off, two-run home run in the 13th inning to beat the Miami Marlins at Wrigley Field on June 6, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the Marlins 5-3 in 13 innings. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

CHICAGO, IL – JUNE 06: Anthony Rizzo #44 of the Chicago Cubs hits a walk-off, two-run home run in the 13th inning to beat the Miami Marlins at Wrigley Field on June 6, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the Marlins 5-3 in 13 innings. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

#4 Joc Pederson vs. #5 Manny Machado

This is the power match-up I’m really looking forward to watching, and I hope it doesn’t disappoint. As mentioned in the beginning, Pederson, who made his debut late last season, is one of the most powerful young swingers of today’s game. So far this season, he holds the farthest average home run distance over all of MLB, even farther than Giancarlo Stanton. His 2o have averaged 431′ and he is also the only one in the field to have hit one 475’+. I think Pederson is the best bet to put one in the Ohio River, and I’m excited to see him mash. Here’s to hoping he doesn’t pull a Puig from last year and throw up a goose egg. *Lefty alert* Be on river watch

Joc Pederson

Joc Pederson

The Orioles’ third baseman, Manny Machado, is known more for his dazzling defensive spectacles, but he has been known to put a charge into one. While his home runs don’t always travel to the moon, he hits a decent amount. Machado has only hit one homer of 430’+ in his career, while Pederson has notched has already notched 11 of such a distance in 2015 alone. Machado does have the top exit velocity of 114.9 MPH.

Manny Machado

Manny Machado

Predictions

For those of you that are 18 years or older and are interested in winning $5,000, you can fill out a Home Run Derby bracket by clicking here. For what it’s worth, I’ll share what I think will happen, so if you’re making a bracket, you can be sure the opposite of whatever I predict will probably happen.

In the first round, I see all four top seeds moving on. I think the only real toss-up is Pujols and Bryant, because Bryant could really put on a display, show up Pujols, and knock him out early. Just not sure this is going to happen.

I have Pederson moving on taking care of Pujols in the second round, and Frazier besting Donaldson to move on to the finals.

My winner will be Joc Pederson. While it would be fun for the Cincinnatians to see their guy Frazier take home the title, I think he comes up just short again this year. However, Frazier is the betting favorite.

Regardless of my predictions, I am fully expecting one of the best home run derbies of recent memory. It will be a sight to see these power sluggers putting their strength on display in the Great American Small Park. So be sure to tune in to ESPN at 8 PM Eastern on Monday Night. And keep your eyes out for excitement besides the hits too; you never know, one of those shaggers may make another crazy catch.

Jordan Zimmermann Throws First No-Hitter in Nationals History

On Sunday, September 28, 2014, Jordan Zimmermann threw the first no-hitter in Washington Nationals history. I was fortunate enough to be in attendance for the historic event, and I am excited to share my perspective of everything that happened. So much happened in fact, that I decided to split it up into two posts: one about the actual game and one about after the game.

Unlike Opening Day, Sunday consisted of perfect weather. We got to Nationals Park early in order to meet up with some family friends. As I was standing around checking Twitter, I saw a tweet that not too far from where I was standing, MASN Dan (Dan Kolko) was taking pictures with fans. I hurried over to the MASN area in left field and got a picture with him myself:

Dan Kolko and I on the day Jordan Zimmermann threw a no-hitter

Dan Kolko and I on the day Jordan Zimmermann threw a no-hitter

From there it was time to make our way to our seats. We walked around the stadium to Section 319 and took in the sights on what I mentioned was such a fantastic day; maybe an omen for the events which were about to transpire.

The Nationals were playing the Miami Marlins, and Jordan Zimmermann was being opposed by Henderson Alverez. As you may remember, Alverez tossed a no-hitter in last season’s concluding game. He took a no-hitter into the ninth inning, but the game was still scoreless. Then in the bottom of the ninth, the Marlins walked-off in what was one of the craziest endings to a no-hitter in the history of baseball.

All my life, whenever I attend a baseball game, I go hoping to see a no-hitter. I constantly check the scoreboard until I see both teams have recorded a hit; it’s just one of my baseball-watching obsessions. So on Sunday, unlike Tyler Moore, who didn’t know a no-hitter was being thrown until the ninth inning, I was attentive to the fact of what was occurring before my eyes the entire game.

Jordan Zimmermann throws a pitch

Jordan Zimmermann throws a pitch

The game started off quickly. Zimmermann recorded a 1-2-3 first inning and the Nats were also set down in order. However, when Ryan Zimmerman came to the plate in the first inning, the crowd sang Happy Birthday to him, as he had just reached 30 years old.

In the second, it was six up six down for JZ, who just kept on rolling. Then in the bottom half of the inning, Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond launched his 24th home run of the year and that gave the Nats a 1-0 lead.

The Marlins could not muster a baserunner in the third inning either. When the Nationals got up, it was time for the crowd to begin acknowledging the hard work the starters had put in all season long. After Denard Span doubled, he was replaced by Nate Schierholtz, and he received a standing ovation as he walked into the dugout. The same happened in the bottom of the 4th, when Adam LaRoche and Bryce Harper were replaced by Tyler Moore and Scott Hairston, respectively.

Zimmermann’s perfect game was intact until the fifth inning. Chantilly High School’s own Justin Bour drew a two-out walk to give the Marlins their first man on base of the day. I was slightly disappointed the perfect game was gone, but I could tell how well JZ was pitching and I knew there was a strong possibility I could still witness history.

The game continued on and the tension continued to build. While no more runs were scored, the excitement grew as each out was recorded. I have never been to a baseball game before where the whole stadium was so into every pitch; it was an atmosphere I will not forget for a long time.

In the top of the seventh, Miami was able to put a second person on base. Garrett Jones struck out, but the ball bounced away from Wilson Ramos, and Jones was able to make it to first on the dropped third strike. I was glad he was not the only baserunner for the Marlins. If their only runner had been on a dropped third strike, that would have been quite disappointing. Ramos made up for not blocking the pitch though, by picking Jones off of first base. The crowd erupted as the umpire signaled him out, and just like that, Zimmerman was six outs away.

The Nationals did not score in the bottom of the seventh or the bottom of the eighth, so the game went into the top of the ninth with the Nats still ahead 1-0. Stephen Souza Jr. was inserted into left field as a defensive replacement. Jordan Zimmermann needed only three outs to secure his place in Nationals lore. The crowd was on their feet, cameras were recording, and I stayed nervous.

The first two outs were recorded quickly. Then the magic happened. Christian Yelich stepped to the plate as the last chance for the Marlins to avoid being no-hit. On a 2-1 count, he drove a ball to deep left field. The crowd held its breath and Zimmermann threw his head back as he was sure the ball would drop for a double. All of a sudden, out of nowhere, the aforementioned Souza came flying in and made a spectacular diving catch to save the day. Bedlum ensued as the players stormed the field.

After the celebration, it was time for Zimmermann to be interviewed by none other than MASN Dan. Zimmermann was showered in Gatorade, bubble gum, and even an equipment bag as well as a rosin bag. Jayson Werth did the honors of throwing the pie in Zimmermann’s face and Werth took no mercy on Kolko either, pieing him as well.

You can see my first hand account of all these events in the YouTube video below. It covers the entire ninth inning as well as the on-field post-game events.

It was a spectacular day. However, the final out did not spell the end of interesting things for me. Be sure to read the next post containing what happened after we left our seats. You definitely won’t want to miss it…

Gnome Sweet Gnome: The Jayson Werth Garden Gnome Experience

Almost two years ago, I created my Twitter account (@PaulFritschner) and began to follow an account called Jayson Werth’s Beard (@JWerthsBeard).  The real-life owner of this account remains anonymous, so we simply refer to it as the Beard.  It posts creative photoshops relating to the Washington Nationals, possibly it’s most famous of which is a picture of Jayson Werth’s face photoshopped onto the face of a garden gnome.

An original photoshop of a Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Courtesy of @Jwerthsbeard)

An original Jayson Werth Garden Gnome photoshop (Courtesy of @Jwerthsbeard)

Back in February, the Nationals announced the promotional schedule, and wouldn’t ya know: August 5th was the Jayson Werth Garden Gnome. Bobbleheads do not usually matter much to me as far as a must-have giveaway, but after seeing all those crazy photoshops, I knew I had to get myself a gnome. You may ask, what’s the craze? It’s just a plastic garden gnome of a player. Maybe to you it’s a plastic garden gnome, but to the Nationals community it is a fantastic piece of baseball memorabilia.

The day was getting closer and after seeing the lines for the Bryce Harper Bobblehead, along with all the promotion the Nationals were doing on social media for this gnome (also here), I knew the lines were going to be incredible. I thought to myself, well, if I’m going to get there so early to be able to get one, I might as well be first, right? In order to be first would mean a long wait. To aid in my relief from boredom, I asked my friend from school, Francis Bright, if he would attend the game with me and wait in line. He was all for it, and Gnome Gnight was set.

We arrived downtown around 1:15 and when we couldn’t see a line at the gates forming yet, so we walked down the street to grab some lunch at Potbelly. We figured it would be a long, hot couple of hours, so we made sure we were adequately prepared.

To my surprise, nobody was in line yet, and we walked up simultaneously with one other man to take our spot in a line.  This was right around 2:10, and the gates opened at 4:30, so we now had about 2 hours and 20 minutes before we could receive our gnome.

The Gnomes in boxes

The Gnomes in boxes

First in line for the Jayson Werth Garden Gnome around 2:10 (Paul Fritschner)

First in line for the Jayson Werth Garden Gnome around 2:10 (Paul Fritschner)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We brought our gloves for batting practice, and I had brought a ball, so we played catch for about a half hour until we decided we should sit at the gate so as to secure our place in line. This meant that we were relegated to finding a way to pass about two more hours.

At 3:30, with exactly one hour left to go, I got a Direct Message on Twitter from Scott Allen, a sports writer for the Washington Post. He asked if he could interview me about waiting in the line. I was ecstatic, and did the interview over the phone a few minutes later.

Around that same time was when the line began to take shape. I took this picture right before the interview:

I relayed the message to many people I knew about what had just happened, including podcast co-host Steve Miller. he was the first one to send me the link to the article after it was posted within minutes. I will include all the links to the article later in this post.

The interview excitement helped the next few minutes go very quickly. All of a sudden there was less than a half hour to go, and the excitement was building. Throngs of people made their way down Half-Street from the Metro, anxious to take their place in line.

27 minutes to go

27 minutes to go

The ushers began to prepare for the onslaught of gnome-hungry fans. After all the time waiting, I was beginning to get somewhat anxious for the gates to finally open. With seven minutes to go, it was now a sea of red down Half-Street and around the gates.

Then at 4:30, after nearly two years of photoshops, six months of waiting for this game, and almost two and a half hours at the gate, I had my hands on a Jayson Werth Garden Gnome.

As an added benefit to being in the front of the line, this meant prime position in the Red Porch to take in batting practice. Francis got a ball right after we had gotten ourselves situated when, who I believe was, Tanner Roark launched a ball that bounced off the field and up into the seats. It was now my turn for a ball of my own.

Since I was little, I have attended Potomac Nationals games, as I wrote about in my very first post. I have collected dozens of baseballs from those games and many baseballs from Major League games, but even after all these years, I have never caught a ball on the fly. As in, catch a foul ball or a home run before it hits the ground. I’m always having to chase after them. I made it my goal to catch at least one before I go off to college next year, and I thought that maybe after all the good things that happened, today would be the day.

Sure enough, Danny Espinosa (99% positive it was him) launched a home run right to where I was standing. It was only a matter of whether I or the few other people standing around me would get it. I stuck my glove way up (shades of The Sandlot), and the ball smacked right into my glove. I had finally been in the right place at the right time.

Danny Espinosa BP Home Run ball

Danny Espinosa BP Home Run ball

The day was now on another level.  Francis and I watched the Nationals finish up batting practice and proceeded to watch the Mets. We didn’t catch any more baseballs, but I was plenty satisfied. I had my gnome, a baseball, and an interview. Now all we needed was a Curly W.

Francis and I made our way to the other side of the stadium to begin our ascent to our seats in Section 226. My dad was already sitting up there, and when we arrived he had just had a conversation with the couple behind him. Apparently they were already aware of the interview article and confirmed I was the one who was in it. It’s amazing how quickly information spreads

Lefty Gio Gonzalez started for the Nats, opposed by Zach Wheeler for the Mets. Gio gave up a triple in the first inning to Daniel Murphy, who later came in to score to make it 1-0. The Mets added another run in the top of the second before the Nats answered with a run of their own in the bottom of the second on a wild pitch to make it 2-1.

Both pitchers began to settle into a groove, but the groove for Gio would only last so long. The Nats could not provide him with much run support, even squandering a scoring opportunity when a groundball hit Asdrubal Cabrera. Ian Desmond had to return to third base and did not end up scoring, thus leaving the Nationals still at a deficit.

Gio began to struggle in the 7th inning with the Nats still trailing 2-1. Drew Storen replaced him with men on first and second, both of whom came in to score after a sacrifice bunt by Wheeler and a single by Daniel Murphy.

The Nats gave up one more run in the 8th inning to make it 6-1, the eventual final score. They could not muster much of a rally in the game’s final two innings, leading to a defeat on Gnome Gnight. A Curly W was not in the books after all. Jayson Werth himself did not get a gnome, and said post-game of the 15,000+ who didn’t receive one, “I know how they feel.” Also an interesting statistic I read from Scott Allen today. This season, the Nats are 1-6 when playing in front of 40,000+ people and 2-10 when playing in front of that many since 2013.

However, while the actual game may not have been fantastic, basically everything else about the day was.

The interview took off and was posted in various articles across many different websites.

The original article, written by Scott Allen of the Washington Post, can be found by clicking here.

A section of USA Today called For the Win picked it up, the article for which can be found here.

The website Deadspin also did a piece of their own on the line for the Gnomes and their article can be found here.

We were hyperlinked in an article on the NBC Washington website and that can be found here.

Finally, for those curious, the gnome is being sold on eBay for over 150$. So if you think its just a cheap giveaway, it’s a giveaway that could earn you some money if you wanted to sell it. Check out the bids here. I for one will be keeping my gnome.

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Here are some more pictures from the rest of Gnome Gnight. It was really a fun day; a day I will not forget for a long time.

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

The Jayson Werth Garden Gnome

The Jayson Werth Garden Gnome

The Washington Nationals take batting practice

The Washington Nationals take batting practice

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

Panorama picture of Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Panorama picture of Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

The Gnomes in boxes

The Gnomes in boxes

Waiting in line for the gnome

Waiting in line for the gnome

Nationals Park employees unpack the Garden Gnomes

Nationals Park employees unpack the Garden Gnomes

Paul Fritschner and Francis Bright

Paul Fritschner and Francis Bright

Waiting in line for the gnome

Waiting in line for the gnome

Post-Interview (...get it...)

Post-Interview (…get it…)

27 minutes to go (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

27 minutes to go (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Nationals Park (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

Line for Jayson Werth Garden Gnome (Paul Fritschner)

A fan dressed as a gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)

A fan dressed as a gnome (Picture by Paul Fritschner)